Books

big-picture-cover-smallThe Big Picture: Building Blocks of a Christian World View
by Brian Harris

This book is an accessible exploration of the big building blocks of the Christian faith, differentiating between the important contours of a Christian worldview and secondary concerns imposed by culture and tradition. “Skilfully bringing together biblically-informed theology and the everyday world, Brian Harris unpacks themes of grace, creation and Christian hope in an engaging conversational manner. The result is a book that empowers us to live out our faith wherever we are.” Stephen Garner, Laidlaw College, Auckland, New Zealand.

 

 

 

 

Tortoise Usually Wins Cover

Tortoise Usually Wins, The: Biblical Reflections On Quiet Leadership For Reluctant Leaders
by Brian Harris

The Tortoise Usually Wins is a delightful exploration of the theory of quiet leadership. Written for reluctant leaders, it interacts with three key biblical images of leadership – the leader as servant, shepherd and steward – and links them with some of the key virtues of quiet leadership – modesty,restraint, tenacity, interdependence and othercenteredness. Brian Harris is the principal of a highly regarded theological seminary and also pastors a thriving local church, so the book carries the wisdom of both professor and pastor, satisfying the reader both intellectually and practically. These insights are supplemented by interviews with significant quiet leaders from around the world, ensuring a rich feast for prospective and current reluctant leaders.

 

 

Revisioning, Renewing, Rediscovering The Triune Center
by Derek J. Tidball (Editor), Brian S. Harris (Editor), Jason S. Sexton (Editor)

An international cast of theologians come together in this volume to offer essays in tribute to the late Stanley J. Grenz, one of the leading theologians of his generation. Accordingly, the volume includes timely explorations in some of the most exciting areas in contemporary theology. It is only fitting that these very explorations revolve around the key motifs of Grenz’s theology (Trinity, community, eschatology) and the key sources from which he drew for theology’s construction (Scripture, tradition, culture). While engaging key features seen in Grenz’s work, some of the essays here interact with Grenz’s own writings, reflecting on his theological journey and his contributions to evangelical theology. In these ways, this volume highlights the kind of evangelical theology that so many have experienced in recent years and of which Stan Grenz was a leading proponent. Revisioning, Renewing, Rediscovering the Triune Center, then, makes a significant contribution to discussions in contemporary theology while itself setting out to honor the life and work of an eminent theologian who did so much for evangelical theology.