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Managing Monday with John Stott: Take 2

Posted by on Oct 16, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Several years after his death, the ministry of John Stott (1921-2011) continues to impact many people, most commonly through his writing, with his classic Basic Christianity, his profound study The Cross of Christ and the deep insight shown in I Believe in Preaching, continuing to win him new fans. Stott was one of the key authors of the 1974 Lausanne Covenant, which continues to shape evangelicalism. Here is a second selection of some of his insights… Until you see the cross as that which is done by you, you will never appreciate that it is done for you. John Stott Of course it costs...

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Managing Monday with John Stott

Posted by on Oct 9, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Several years after his death, the ministry of John Stott (1921-2011) continues to impact many people, most commonly through his writing, with his classic Basic Christianity, his profound study The Cross of Christ and the deep insight shown in I Believe in Preaching, continuing to win him new fans. Stott was one of the key authors of the 1974 Lausanne Covenant, which continues to shape evangelicalism. Here are some of his insights… The Gospel is good news of mercy to the undeserving. The symbol of the religion of Jesus is the cross, not the scales. John Stott Humility before God is...

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Managing Monday with T.S.Eliot – Take 2

Posted by on Oct 2, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Ever since studying Murder in the Cathedral during my school years, I have been a bit of a T.S.Eliot fan. For those not familar with his work, Eliot (1888-1965), who identifed himself as an Anglo-Catholic, was one of the most significant poets and playwrights of the twentieth century. In 1948 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Here is a second taste of some of his many reflections… Anxiety is the handmaiden of creativity. T.S.Eliot The purpose of literature is to turn blood into ink. T.S.Eliot Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time. T.S.Eliot Only those who risk going...

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Managing Monday with T.S.Eliot

Posted by on Sep 25, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

Ever since studying Murder in the Cathedral during my school years, I have been a bit of a T.S.Eliot fan. For those not familar with his work, Eliot (1888-1965), who identifed himself as an Anglo-Catholic, was one of the most significant poets and playwrights of the twentieth century. In 1948 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Here is a tiny taste of some of his many reflections… Where is the life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information? T.S.Eliot To do the useful thing, to say the courageous...

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The Plebiscite…

Posted by on Sep 20, 2017 in Blog | 6 comments

In 2015 I presented a paper at a forum on Sexuality and the Church which largely focused on same sex marriage. I have been asked to re-present it many times, and posted its content on this blog in 2015. It remains the one which has attracted the most hits, though tucked away as it is with the posts from 2015, some have found it difficult to find, and so in the light of the current Australian plebiscite on this issue, I am re-posting it. While I take a stance (no), I have genuinely tried to understand and be respectful towards those who will be voting yes, and have attempted to fairly present...

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Managing Monday with George Herbert – Take 2

Posted by on Sep 18, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

George Herbert (1593-1633) was a Welsh born Anglican priest, theologian, poet and orator. Though he was only 39 when he died, he accomplished an extraordinary amount in his life (including a brief stint in the Parliament of England in 1624 and 1625). While a priest remembered for his genuine care of his parishioners, he struggled with his call to ministry, reflected in one of his most famous poems The Collar which concludes with the words, But as I rav’d and grew more fierce and wilde At every word, Me thoughts I heard one calling, Child! And I reply’d, My Lord. For a second week...

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Church: From Members to Attenders…

Posted by on Sep 12, 2017 in Blog | 2 comments

Language reflects the way we think about things, and with that in mind I was struck when someone recently claimed that it has only been in the last 50 years or so that Christians have spoken about “going to this church” or “attending this church”. For the many hundreds of years before that, they would have said “I belong to this church”or “I am a member of this church”. If the claim is true (and I suspect it is) it’s an interesting change – from members to attenders. Think through the implications… Attenders are primarily...

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Managing Monday with George Herbert

Posted by on Sep 11, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

George Herbert (1593-1633) was a Welsh born Anglican priest, theologian, poet and orator. Though he was only 39 when he died, he accomplished an extraordinary amount in his life (including a brief stint in the Parliament of England in 1624 and 1625). While a priest remembered for his genuine care of his parishioners, he struggled with his call to ministry, reflected in one of his most famous poems The Collar which concludes with the words, But as I rav’d and grew more fierce and wilde At every word, Me thoughts I heard one calling, Child! And I reply’d, My Lord. Here are a few of...

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Protestants, Reformers or Transformers…

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017 in Blog | 4 comments

As the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation draws near (it is usually dated from Luther posting his 95 theses on the church door in Wittenberg on 31 October, 1517), it is worth asking if we are now primarily protestants (from protestors) or reformers. The Protestant Reformation involved both protest and reform. It was a protest against a corrupt religious system, and some of its particular practices, such as the sale of indulgences. Later it was a strong protest against the April 19th, 1529 reversal of the August 27, 1526 German Reichstag decree allowing each individual government...

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Managing Monday with Parker J Palmer – Take 3

Posted by on Sep 4, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

I first came across the work of Parker J Palmer (1939-present) when I was loaned a copy of his book The Courage to Teach. It’s a wonderful read, and it led me to track down some insights from his wider writings. Palmer, a Quaker, is well known for his work on education, social change, vocation and spirituality. Today is our third and final look at some of his insights… The questions we ask ourselves are at least as important as the answers we come up with, often more so – Parker J Palmer The highest form of love is the love that allows for intimacy without annihilation of...

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